Eulogy to Catherine Crout-Habel

 

Catherine's Gravatar

Catherine’s Gravatar

This week has brought very sad news for many people. Last Sunday Catherine Crout-Habel passed away after illness. Some of you knew her, but for those of you who didn’t…Catherine, admin at Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family, was a super person with a great sense of humor. It was two years ago we made each other’s acquaintance and quickly formed a friendship. What privilege it was to know her.

Catherine’s love for history and genealogy was as infectious as her humor. She labored tirelessly in an effort to preserve history in South Australia where graves are being recycled. Even in the face of opposition she stood strong and never wavered. When people got her down with pettiness Catherine would bounce back with a laugh; pity parties weren’t her thing. All through that she always found time to offer words of encouragement to other bloggers and leave cheery comments. She made it a joy to publish new posts at Map of Time and I could always count on her for a thought-provoking comment followed by good-natured banter.

Whenever I had an absurd question Catherine would patiently answer it and – if I needed more information – put me in contact with someone who could give a detailed answer. Ah the fun we had with genealogy as we both utilized our sources to come to a conclusion. She was always prepared to lend a helping hand to people. How much I long for the discussions of cultural differences that she, Metan and I took part in. Would that we had been able to have had one more chat of even just trivial things. Or even better gotten together and annoyed everyone around us with our penny whistles.

Catherine’s passion for history and its preservation garnered her an enormous amount of respect from people all over the world. We have lost a gem. Her passing has come as a tremendous and sad shock.

It’s hard to say goodbye, Catherine.

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44 thoughts on “Eulogy to Catherine Crout-Habel

    • Indeed she was, Jill. She was the kind of person that liked to laugh and to make people laugh. And on top of that she did so much work in preserving history.

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  1. Oh no, that’s so sad :(. Did you ever get to meet her in person? I have become so close to so many of my blogging friends, I think losing one of them would be like losing a family member. I’m very sorry for your loss.

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    • Thanks, Cindy. Sadly no we never met in person. I wish that we could have though. What a riot that would have been! :)

      It’s a lot like losing family. Three years ago never once would I have thought it would possible, but it is.

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    • I have often wondered how we would find out if blogging friends passed away. One would hope that their family would do a post to let everyone know, but I’m sure a lot of families don’t know how to access their online accounts. I have actually made up a binder that tells my family where to access those details.

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    • Indeed! I’ve done the same but seem to have lost the notebook that had all that information in it. *fumes* So much for organization.

      But on another note, I certainly hope your family will not have to access those binders for many, many years!

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    • Thank you, Laurie. It’s a very sad time for many people. I hope that Catherine’s legacy continues through her blog and her grave-saving work. She certainly did much to bring to attention the plight of the recycling of graves.

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    • And I have to admit that I’d never heard of such! I’m familiar with the grave stacking (I have no idea if that is the correct term) in New Orleans. Is it similar to that?

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  2. Sorry to hear about your friends passing! Prayers and thoughts of comfort! I love blogging it’s such a neat way to connect and make friends with people! Hugz Lisa and Bear

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    • Kirrily, thank you so much for stopping by. My sincerest condolences to you and yours. I wish that we – bloggers and members of Saving Graves – had been able to tell Catherine how much she was appreciated before she passed. I truly had no idea she was so ill (and only just this week seen her April post that spoke of the stroke :( ).

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  3. “Death is not extinguishing the light; it is only putting out the lamp because the dawn has come.”Rabindranath Tagore

    My thoughts and prayers are with the family. Your profoundly moving tribute for Catherine Crout-Habel, is a reminder that we must treasure the moments we have and build memories to sustain us on the journey forward.

    Thank you!

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    • Thank you for your kind thoughts, Rebecca. It’s true that times like these drive home how fragile life is and how we should value friends and family even more.

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    • Many thanks, Kevin. While this is a sad time it makes one very proud to have been able to have known Catherine. I think one of my biggest regrets right now though is the fact that I didn’t tell Catherine how much she was appreciated. The response to her passing in the genealogy, saving graves and blogging world has been astounding; there have been tributes written among other things. Would that we could have told her these things beforehand.

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    • When I was a journalist I would occasionally have to write obituaries about local people who had died, not necessarily big names, but folks who had lived interesting lives, war veterans who survived great travails, people who left an indelible stamp on a local hospital, etc. I was struck by how many times I found myself wishing I’d known this person when they were still alive so that I could talk with them.

      You may not have been able to tell Catherine how much you appreciated her, but you’ve been able to tell many people who didn’t know her about all she accomplished. That’s no small feat, J.G.

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    • Thank you for that. I have mentally struggled over and over with the words left unsaid.

      I know exactly what you mean. In the course of research I wade through a lot of obituaries and oftentimes read those that do not belong to the people I’m looking for but nevertheless they tend to stick in my mind. It drives home just how important the “average person” is to so many people whose lives they have touched directly and indirectly.

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    • Thank you for stopping by, Kylie. I just read your tribute to Catherine and think it’s wonderful that you made a loan in her memory. She is going to be missed so much.

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