Aboard the Museum Ship: USS LST-325

They say pictures are worth a thousand words. So sticking with the saying I’ll let the pictures do the talking (and just give a little background information on this vessel). The USS LST-325, launched in late 1942 in Philadelphia, took part in D-Day. By 1964 she had been given to Greece before nearly falling prey to scrappers years later. It was in 2000 that she was saved by a group of Americans who got her up and running and brought her home. Today the ship is docked in Evansville, IN.

The above pictures aren’t the best quality, but maybe some of you will find them interesting.

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20 thoughts on “Aboard the Museum Ship: USS LST-325

    • It was definitely an experience. Even it was cold. I’d love to do it again some time. For me the only drawback was that the bridge was restricted. The engine room was too. The guide said the radio room is usually off limits, but they let us see it.

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  1. Amazing pictures ! I would love to visit that one day !
    Did you take all the pictures yourself ?
    Captain’s cabin #1 just to let you know has a arm of someone in it.

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    • Yes I took the pictures. I wish they had turned out better, but space was limited. The companionways and halls were narrow and there were other ‘tourists’ along with us. The arm you mentioned is the guide’s, and I didn’t notice it till afterwards.

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    • Cool, what kind of camera did u use ? It looks like a good one from the pics.
      Well I think the pictures came out great personally 🙂
      Ah I see.

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  2. Hi J.G. I do find these pictures interesting and so cool. I recently went on an aircraft carrier in San Diego. 😉 I am sure you know which one I mean, so I will post pictures of those soon. I love these pictures. Never been on the LST-325 so glad you took me virtually there.

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  3. Τhanks to the american citizens for their nice decision. my army service in “ΣΥΡΟΣ”
    was in August 1966 – Feb 1968.
    Antonios from Souda, Creta

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    • yes, LST-325 was named “SYROS” in Greek navy. my service was in radio room.
      i was telegrafist

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    • How interesting! As you can see from the photos we were able to visit the radio room. The radio room and the wheelhouse were the highlights of the trip. The crew quarters (quartermaster’s?) would have been too but it was so crowded I wasn’t able to get such a good look.

      Thanks for sharing!

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  4. Thanks for the amazing pictures. My husband spent 31 years in the Navy. Now to be able to take my great niece and nephew on board the LST 325. It was in Charleston, WV. It was a great tour and the weather was great. This will be a great school project.

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    • Thanks for sharing, Frances, and also for your kind words. I was able to snap a few photos of the LST’s exterior before it left Evansville, albeit from a distance. I’ll be posting that in a few days.

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  5. Ηι again. During my service in “ΣΥΡΟΣ” (LST 325) as radio operator, we had two important experiences of enterprises (trips) which concerned the Greek political-historical events, the year 1967.
    At one of them :”ΣΥΡΟΣ” was the leader!! Both of them i published in the local newspaper in the last six months. Unfortunately i’ m not able to translate them in English. One is seven pages and the other 3. Greetings

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  6. I have toured tall ships (Baltimore) to air craft carriers (San Diego). I expect these to be in coastal harbors… maybe the Great Lakes. How did they get a ship to Evensville, IN? And, where did they dock it? Is this not in the middle of the continent?
    Oscar

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    • It’s true that we are in the middle of the US, but Evansville is located on the Ohio River. During WWII a shipyard turning out a number of LSTs was in operation on the riverfront (though the LST-325 is not one of those constructed in Evansville). The ship is currently docked a little ways down the Ohio towards Henderson, KY. It’s a fun place to visit. I hope to do it again soon.

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